CORYDON. by Andre Gide With a comment on the second dialogue in. CORYDON by FRANK BEACH, Department of Psychology, Yale University. NEW YORK. Considered by Gide to be the most important of his books, this slim, exquisitely book is of the kind which will do me the greatest harm, Gide wrote of his Corydon. In his preface to the first American edition–published in , the year before his death–Gide says: “Corydon remains in my opinion the most important of my.

Author: Kazrak Dajora
Country: Poland
Language: English (Spanish)
Genre: Medical
Published (Last): 21 January 2017
Pages: 426
PDF File Size: 1.62 Mb
ePub File Size: 15.2 Mb
ISBN: 701-1-94106-663-9
Downloads: 5241
Price: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader: Vira

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Return to Book Page. Considered by Gide to be the most important of his books, this gie, exquisitely crafted volume consists of four dialogues on the subject of homosexuality and its place in society.

Published anonymously in bits and pieces between andCorydon first appeared in a signed, commercial edition in France in and in the United States inthe year before Gide’s Considered by Gide to be the most important of his books, this slim, exquisitely crafted volume consists of four dialogues on the subject of homosexuality and its place in society.

Published anonymously in bits cprydon pieces between andCorydon first appeared in a signed, commercial edition in France in and in the United States inthe year before Gide’s death. The present edition features the impeccable translation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Richard Howard.

In spirited dialogue with his bigoted, boorish interviewer, Corydon marshals evidence from naturalists, historians, poets, and philosophers to support his contention that homosexuality pervaded the most culturally and artistically advanced civilizations, from Greece in the age of Pericles to Renaissance Italy and England in the age of Shakespeare. Although obscured by later critics, literature and art from Homer to Coryson proclaim the true nature of relationships between such lovers as Achilles and Patrocles—not to mention Virgil’s mythical Corydon and his shepherd, Alexis, constructed union, while the more fundamental, natural relation is the homosexual one.

In these pages, contemporary readers will find gied prescient and courageous treatment of a topic that has scarcely become less controversial.

Questions?

Paperbackpages. Published July 18th by University of Illinois Press first published To see what your friends cordyon of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Corydonplease sign up. Lists with This Book. Mar 29, Yannis Thomadakis rated it it was amazing. The book that shaped my life to the very inch. When I was reading this marvellous dialogue and thesis in defence of homosexuality, I was forydon mesmerised by the clarity of the arguments, the variation of philosophical and scientific opinions, the unprecedented compassion and acknowledgement of the Human Nature.

This very small volume makes you see Homosexuality and Love in general with a more mature, cprydon -earth perspective, as a natural selection of the living species on Earth. What is The book that shaped my life to the very inch.

What is more, you can fathom and perceive the hypocricy and the inhuman social policy of the Human Society and Civilization, through the ages. An enlighting masterpiece, which should be taught in schools. A “period piece” from a period that’s way-back-when in modernism.

The Socratic argument is weak and, I think, unnecessary. Gide takes the wrong approach here–but he was a writer of his time. Of interest are his comments on Proust–his explanation of why Charlus is such a superior creation than Albertine. And amusing that Gide feels offended when accused of not making his homosexuality explicit soon enough. His great works, “The Immoralist” and “The Counterfeiters” puts that accusation immediately A “period piece” from a period that’s way-back-when in modernism.

His great works, “The Immoralist” and “The Counterfeiters” puts that accusation immediately to rest.

Feb 09, Josephine biblioseph marked it as to-not-read. Despite his eloquence, I just can’t bring myself to read beautiful sentences if they’re in defense of pederasty. It’s remarkable how beautifully crafted his journal is, even when writing about sex with underage boys.

  LINGUISTICA PARA LOGOPEDAS IGNACIO MORENO PDF

Corydon – André Gide – Google Books

He doesn’t even apologize! Wonder if I should just toss the rest of his books as well There’s so many other books I could read. Aug 06, Rodrigo rated it liked it. Some of the dialogues are more interesting and effective than others the first is the best, and I can see why his friends encouraged him to stop while he was “ahead”and the overall piece is certainly outdated; still, and unfortunately, much of the argument made here remains relevant.

This is also an excellent example of the political, social, legal, and philosophical arguments surrounding homosexuality in the earlys. Gide makes a truly troubling slip at the very end of the final dialogu Some of the dialogues are more interesting and effective than others the first is the best, and I can see why his friends encouraged him to stop while he was “ahead”and the overall piece is certainly outdated; still, and unfortunately, much of the argument made here remains relevant.

Gide makes a truly troubling slip at the very end of the final dialogue, but perhaps that was unavoidable given the time. The Socratic dialogues aren’t necessarily very sophisticated, but they’re not without value.

A quick read, a bit dated of course, but interesting for the historical perspective, as well as how much of it–particularly the first dialogue–still pertains today. Here we are, a hundred years after the first edition made perfectly cogent and undeniable arguments, continuing to have the same debate in almost the same words. I do want to make a note on Gide’s use of the word “pederast”, which seems to confuse some reviewers. It doesn’t have the same meaning as our word “pedophile”, which denote A quick read, a bit dated of course, but interesting for the historical perspective, as well as how much of it–particularly the first dialogue–still pertains today.

It doesn’t have the same meaning as our word “pedophile”, which denotes an attraction to very young children who have not entered puberty.

What he’s talking about is a relationship between a man in his twenties or thirties and a boy in his teens. They didn’t have the word teenager then; the concept had yet to be invented. This is in France, which until just a few years ago had no such thing as a legal age of consent, and men were free to diddle 12 year girls all day long.

Corydon, in his argument, is simply asking for the same rules to apply to boys. The issue regarding my reviewing this book is that some sections, as usual with my reading a french text, slip by me. I am glad that I read this. I am glad, also, that I read it in French. Although I have an interest in reading more gay literature, I would likely not have sought out this book as I had never heard of it.

I was given a free French copy at a local book repository. This book, although he considered it his most important according to what I read, does not have the fame of the counter The issue regarding my reviewing this book is that some sections, as usual with my reading a french text, slip by me.

This book, although he considered it his most important according to what I read, does not have the fame of the counterfeiters. I did like the counterfeiters a lot.

Nov 07, Mason rated it really liked it. A shockingly relevant piece of work, given its publication nearly a century ago. Gide poses a number of questions our cultural and moral arbiters still refuse to engage with, namely a self-righteous tendency to deem non-normative behaviors as immoral excusing the tenuous and relativistic existence of norms in the first place.

Mar 04, Fernando rated it it was ok.

Nov 04, Joey rated it liked it. An interesting defense of being gay from the early 20th century, when you could still be jailed for such a thing. It should be noted, Gide is specific about the type of same-sex love he is defending, love and sex between two men.

This particular translation by Richard Howard is corydno it is both lyrical and poetic. Additionally, all of the prefaces written by Gide are gude, providing greater context for the actual four dialogues. Corydon was written over several years, with many changes and addition added by Gide.

  D-LINK DWL-7100AP MANUAL PDF

The result is four dialogues, which not only defend gay men, but also condemn gay men from hiding and refusing to be open about their homosexuality. I am trying to explain why they exist. And since in most cases no one is willing to admit that such things exist, I am examining, I am trying to examine, whether it is really as deplorable as it is said to be—that such things exist. Dialogue One really is an answer to all the people who told him not to formally publish this book because of its damning ramification towards Gide.

Two old friends argue about homosexuality, Corydon in defense. In your heart of hearts you know perfectly well that the censure heaped on you is entirely deserved; you protest so eloquently in whispers, but when it comes coryodn speaking up, you give in.

Dialogue Two is again between the two friends, but this time focuses on explaining nature, and in particular animals. Dialogue Three and Four focuses on humans, and in particular the arts, humanities, and customs of humans. In Dialogue Four, Gide spends a great deal of time talking about ancient societies, and in particular ancient militaries.

Dec 09, Paulo Santos rated it really liked it. I had been curious about reading Corydon for a while, due to its fame. Corydon is somewhat dated, but it is nevertheless interesting, especially because I think it is the first time in modern literature that someone talked about homosexuality as something natural, not as a vice or as a pe I had been curious about reading Corydon for a while, due to its fame. Corydon is somewhat dated, but it is nevertheless interesting, especially because I think it is the first time in modern literature that someone talked about homosexuality as something natural, not as a vice or as a peculiar proclivity.

For that alone, it deserves great ocrydon, not to speak of the courage it coryxon for someone to publish it in the early 20th century.

Add to all that its beautiful French, and it’s a true classic. Feb 26, Micha rated it it was ok Shelves: The first dialogue was interesting because the arguments were so like modern arguments about homosexuality. The second dialogue, consisting mostly of descriptions of animal mating habits, I found rather unfortunate and far too long. The third and fourth I felt included some of that depressing brand of gay male misogyny, which again one sometimes hears today.

This was a formative text for early 20th century discussions of homosexuality, but it definitely doesn’t last because Gide doesn’t really t The first dialogue was interesting because the arguments were so like modern arguments about homosexuality. This was a formative text for early 20th century discussions of homosexuality, but it definitely doesn’t last because Gide doesn’t really transcend his own time.

Gide also doesn’t do much for me in general, which is why having to read so much of him for my thesis is a drag. To write this exquisite dialogue pro homosexuality; The way he uses arguments from the fields of biology, philosophy, history in order to point out the liquidity of the sexual instinct and the force of social imperative that leads to the delusion of its certainty. Aug 01, Katrinka rated it liked it. Unsure how to rate this; in terms of literary intrigue, there isn’t much– but then again, that’s not what the book was designed for.

What I find fascinating is that this piece, written ca. Jul 30, Moureco marked it as to-read Shelves: